Bulldog Club of America

Before You  Buy

 

Thinking about buying a dog? So you've decided to purchase a bulldog. Owning a bulldog can be the beginning of years of happiness as the special bond between humans and canines exceeds even the greatest of expectations. However, to ensure the best relationship with your dog, you must be prepared for some important responsibilities. Keep the following questions in mind as we go along.

 

  • Have I found the right breed to fit into my lifestyle and home?
  • Will you have enough time to spend training a dog?
  • Am I willing to spend the resources to ensure the best future for the dog?

 

 

Selecting a Breeder:

Buy your puppy from a responsible and well-respected breeder. This cannot be stressed enough. BCA strongly recommends you buy a bulldog ONLY from a breeder listed on BCA’s Breeder Directory. Responsible breeders are concerned with the betterment of the breed. For example, they work on breeding healthier dogs with the appropriate temperament for their breed. Once you select a breeder, screen the breeder. Ask to see at least one of the parents (the dam or the sire) of your puppy. See how the dogs in your breeder's home interact with your breeder. Are they friendly and outgoing or do they shy away? The responsible breeder will be screening you, too, looking for the best home for each puppy.  

 

The more common disappointments for pet purchasers come from commercial sources--especially pet shops that often buy puppies from tquestionable sources that take little notice of the quality or health they are producing. The pet store or dog broker will sell you a puppy with a breeder’s name attached to the paperwork—but this puppy may easily have been born in a substandard kennel.  His sire and/or dam are nowhere on the premises. The reputable breeder, on the other hand, will not only be able to demonstrate the pedigree and registration papers, but will also show you either the sire or dam themselves, or pictures of the parent who may be co-owned and live elsewhere. Though the mere presence of "papers" does not guarantee good health, conformation, or temperament, you will most often find these attributes in the puppy who has been raised with loving care in the home or kennel of a conscientious hobby breeder.

 

The serious breeder often strives to produce a potential "champion." Since not all in the litter can quite reach this goal, the breeder will able to offer you a good-looking brother or sister of the show prospect at a reasonable price. Sometimes the distribution of white markings alone may make the difference between the so-called "pet" and show-potential puppy. The pet puppy will have benefited from the same proven bloodlines, nutrition, and medical care as its "champion" littermate. His breeder will have health tested the parents and done the best he can to insure good temperament, soundness, and longevity. Here is your best buy.

 

 

How Much Does A Puppy Cost?

Puppy prices vary across the country and the individual breeder’s requirements. This is not the time to hunt for a bargain. Your new puppy will be a member of your family for his lifetime, so you'll want to make a wise investment. We strongly recommend that you purchase a puppy ONLY from Breeders listed on our Breeder Directory. You will find that their prices are competitive and their breeding standards superior to most. 

 

 

Can You Afford A Puppy?

The purchase price of your puppy is not the only cost you have to consider. Be aware that the puppy you bring home will need proper care: food, health care, (a dog needs annual shots). Your puppy will also need little things like a collar with identification, a bowl, a crate and a leash. Evaluate your budget; ask yourself if you really can afford a dog. Dog Ownership = Responsibility.  Take the time to ask yourself these questions and to make an educated decision. You and your dog will be happier for it. There is no doubt that a puppy is a cuddly bundle of joy, but it is also a huge responsibility.

 

 

Caring for Your Bulldog:

All dogs must be cared for daily. This means proper diet, exercise, grooming and veterinary attention. Do not attempt to be your own veterinarian!  All dogs should be regularly examined by a veterinarian and inoculated against the major infectious canine diseases.

 

 

Training for Everyone:

One way to make your dog a good neighbor is through obedience training. A poorly behaved dog is a problem for everyone. Nothing is more frustrating than attempting to corral a dog that will not "come" when you call. A well trained dog is not only a pleasure to own, he is a goodwill ambassador for the entire canine community. A well-behaved dog is the result of the dog's owner being willing to work with the dog regularly in a systematic manner. Obedience classes are available in most communities. Time spent training your dog is time well spent.